Standard Gauge Railway Nairobi
Kenyans can now expect an electric railway system in two years after Kenya Electricity Transmission Company (KETRACO) signed a KES 24.2 billion contract with CET (China Electric Power Equipment and Technology Company Limited) to electrify the SGR

Kenyans can now expect an electric railway system in two years after Kenya Electricity Transmission Company (KETRACO) signed a KES 24.2 billion contract with CET (China Electric Power Equipment and Technology Company Limited) to electrify the SGR. This news comes after Atanas Maina, the Kenya Railways managing director, expressed scepticism due to Kenya’s unreliable electricity supply.

The project to upgrade the SGR from a diesel line to an electric one will entail the construction of 14 substations between Nairobi and Mombasa. The SGR was designed to accommodate a single electric line which will link to KETRACO’s 400kV transmission line that runs 482 kilometres from Mombasa to Nairobi. The transmission line, which has the highest voltage capacity in East Africa, can transfer 1500MW which is 200MW less than the country’s electricity demand.

“This line was constructed to address low voltages, high transmission losses, unreliable supply, and to strengthen network security and the national grid system,” Fernades Barasa the KETRACO managing director stated.
Electric trains are usually perceived as modern. However, diesel locomotives are a more recent technology than electric locomotives. With an electric line, Kenyans will enjoy faster but perhaps more expensive trips due to high maintenance costs.

2 COMMENTS

  1. the electrification project will create a good starting point to turning to realistic and significant investment in geothermal energy. with the current change of events, it is critical to have a forecast of 1000MW project, which should tap into geothermal energy. It is evident that there is a lot of inefficiencies int he current workforce in all environments. Thus, a possible solution to management costs should maybe focus of first, changing the inefficient culture in the country. Even workforce management has suffered greatly and until a real system of dedicated people who adopt technology solutions, such projects wll remain a burden. I am working on a project that will change how African workforce views efficiency. It has to start from the bottom. From the operators themselves. find my article at http://www.finclock.com on the shift to efficiency a reflection off a necessary paradigm shift in Africa

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